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Flying Bat Flying Bat Happy Halloween

Halloween's origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in). The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the area that Skeleton Walking is now Ireland, believed that on the night before the new year, November 1st, the boundary between the worlds of the living and Skeleton Running the dead became blurred. On the night of October 31, they celebrated Samhain, when it was believed that the ghosts of the dead returned to earth.

During the celebration, the Celts wore costumes, typically consisting of animal heads and skins, and attempted to tell each other's fortunes. When the celebration was over, they re-lit their hearth fires, which they had extinguished earlier Ghost that evening, from the sacred bonfire to help protect them during the coming winter.

By A.D. 43, Romans had conquered the majority of Celtic territory. In the course of the four hundred years that they ruled the Celtic lands, two festivals of Roman origin were combined with the traditional Celtic celebration of Samhain.
In the late 1800s, there was a move in America to mold Halloween into a holiday more about community and neighbourly get-togethers, than about ghosts, pranks, and witchcraft. Ghost Trick or Treating

At the turn of the century, Halloween parties for both children and adults became the most common way to celebrate the day. Parties Tiny Bat focused on games, foods of the season, and festive costumes. Parents were encouraged by newspapers and community leaders to take anything "frightening" or "grotesque" out of Halloween celebrations. Because of their efforts, Halloween lost most of its superstitious and religious overtones by the beginning of the twentieth century.
Despite the best efforts of many schools and communities, vandalism began to plague Halloween celebrations in many communities during the 1920s 1930s. Dancing Skeletons Halloween celebrations in many communities during the 1920s 1930s.

Witch with cauldron

Between 1920 and 1950, the centuries-old practice of trick-or-treating was also revived. Trick-or-treating was a relatively inexpensive way for an entire community to share the Halloween celebration. In theory, families could also prevent tricks being played on them by providing the neighborhood children with small treats. A new American tradition was born, and it has continued to grow.

Flying Witch
   A Canadian Connection

The earliest known reference to ritual begging on Halloween, in English speaking North America occurs in 1911, when a Trick or Treat Boy newspaper in Kingston, Ontario, reported that it was normal for the smaller children to go street guising on Halloween between 6 and 7 P.M., visiting shops and episodes of the network radio programs The Baby Snooks Show in 1946 and Kid Witch neighbours to be rewarded with nuts and candies for their rhymes and songs. Early national attention to trick-or-treating was given in October 1947 issues of the children's magazines Jack and Jill and Children's Activities, and by Halloween The Jack Benny Show and The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet in 1948. The custom had become firmly established in popular culture by 1952, when Walt Disney portrayed it in the cartoon Trick or Treat, Ozzie and Harriet were besieged by trick-or-treaters on an episode of their television show, and UNICEF first conducted a national campaign for children to raise funds for the charity while trick-or-treating.

Trick-or-treating, is an activity for children on or around Halloween in which they proceed from house to house in costumes, asking for treats such as Dancing Jack O'Lantern Jack O'Lantern confectionery with the question, "Trick or treat?" The "trick" part of "trick or treat" is a threat to play a trick on the homeowner or his property if no treat is given. Trick-or-treating is one of the main traditions of Halloween. It has become socially expected that if one lives in a neighborhood with children one should purchase treats in preparation for trick-or-treaters.

Today, Americans spend an estimated $6.9 billion annually on Halloween, making it the country's second largest commercial holiday.

 

 

 

Pumpkins Display - Click for Larger Image
Happy Halloween
Happy Halloween
Happy Halloween
Happy Halloween

Jackolanter Cat

Witch on Broom

 

 

    Skull Beckoning     Happy Halloween Ghost & Pumpkin     Skull Beckoning
Flying Witch
Skeleton Jig Halloween Headstone With Bat Skeleton Jig

 

Halloween divider

 Information sources
http://www.halloweenhistory.org/
http://www.history.com/content/halloween


Cute Cat Carved Pumpkin Pumpkin Carving Patterns - Simple and more advanced patterns


 

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